Vanishing Point

View Your Knowledge Assets Through a Wider Lens

Posted by Nina Martire

November 30, 2016 at 10:34 AM

GoPro has been called “a victim of its own brilliance.” [1] In 2002, the company entered the marketplace as one of those true rarities – a product so innovative that it created a market. Fast-forward to 2016. The company is barely breathing, due in part to heavy competition from lower-cost market entries from companies like HTC and Xiaomi that hit the international marketplace and surpassed GoPro sales in less than 12 months. The damage is also coming from the fact that the company has neglected demands from buyers hungry for simplicity and instant gratification – like that of the more consumer-friendly options like the iPhone, laptops, and even the Blackberry.

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Empowering the Global Workforce One Individual at a Time

Posted by Gregory Weber

November 16, 2016 at 8:38 AM

I work with an organization whose executives struggle daily to advance a mission, achieve meaningful results that yield growth, and align its people around a shared vision. They are failing. Every day. They’re not unusual.

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How Can Blockchain Help You Create and Protect Value?

Posted by Tyler Sweatt

November 9, 2016 at 9:38 AM

“Blockchain Technology is a disruptive platform designed to facilitate the exchange of value.”

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This is Why Your Organizational Transformation Demands Humanity

Posted by Hans Davies

November 2, 2016 at 12:03 PM

In March 2016, my wife and I welcomed our first child. Needless to say, it was a big change for us. As I enjoyed time off with my new family, I had ample time to reflect on transformation and the significance of change for individuals, organizations, and societies.

 

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How Can We Gain Clarity in the Geopolitical Chaos?

Posted by Tyler Sweatt

October 26, 2016 at 9:10 AM

The global field continues to grow more fluid and overloaded with information. Despite having greater ability to access and harness information, our ability to consume and build relevance is diminishing. The global environment is so inundated with data, complexity, and instability; it’s impossible to understand every data point. To keep this state of overload from threatening vital decisions and progress, leaders absolutely must be clear about what they value, and how the organization can create value today and in the future.

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Algorithms Don’t Understand Love – Advertising Week 2016 Presentation Highlights

Posted by Deb Westphal

October 19, 2016 at 9:15 AM

 

The future is exciting. For any organization to grasp its potential and their role in making a positive impact on humanity at large, they must connect as many dots as possible in and across fast-paced, hyperconnected marketplaces. Across every industry, those correlations offer the best chance to create, pursue, and assess our future with openness and optimism. They help organizations and industries to see things they might otherwise miss, helping them to position their business to thrive in an uncertain future.

 

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Liz Ross is the CEO of Periscope, an independent, full-spectrum impact agency. She invited me to join her on the Bing stage during 2016 New York Advertising Week to take a look at look at how (and why) professionals in the marketing field must learn, unlearn, relearn if the industry is to keep up with rapidly changing global realities.

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Applying a Value Model to Innovation

Posted by Dave Baber

October 12, 2016 at 8:58 AM

 

Music is a higher revelation than all wisdom and philosophy.

– Ludwig van Beethoven

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Music moves us, recalls memories, and holds a distinct feeling for each one of us. Live or recorded well, it has the power to change people. Over the course of the last century, we have advanced music in many ways like architectural acoustics and new kinds of instruments. Yet one innovation brings up a question about the tradeoff between quality and mobility.

 

For decades, music was recorded on vinyl or tape. These formats offered a very high level of quality. Albums and cassettes were harder to attain, harder to store, and relatively fragile. So in the late 1990s, recordings moved from tape to digital. This was an innovation that completely altered how we experience music in everyday settings. It democratized music by putting it in an efficient, inexpensive format that could be accessed and shared via countless devices. It also lowered the quality of the music – yet it has continued to gain adoption. Incremental innovations like on-demand streaming music have more than doubled in adoption year over year, while albums and cassettes are embraced primarily by ‘retro’ listeners and aficionados.[1]

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What is the Right Education for the Emerging Global Workforce?

Posted by Chris Gros

October 5, 2016 at 12:30 PM

Standardized educational models in the United States have always reflected our current society and its workforce needs. So why is the majority of our school-aged demographic still engaged in a Second Wave style institution if we now live in a more global, fluid world?

 

In the early days of our country, the educational model consisted of a one-room schoolhouse that focused on teaching basic skills and ensuring students were done in time to help their families work in the fields and at home. In the 1800’s, the educational model evolved slightly to meet the needs of the Industrial Age. And since then, little has changed. This factory model of education, complete with bells that ring to indicate “shift” change, is still the predominant model for our public education system.

 

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Are You Certain You’re Prepared for Unpredictable Threat?

Posted by Gregory Weber

September 28, 2016 at 11:53 AM

Terms like globalized, interconnected, and hyper-empowered are so trumpeted across the infinite 24-hour news hour cycle and media barrage that they have become part of the din – rather than the call to action that they should compel. But, at their core, what has spawned from them?

 

Hyper-connectivity, globalization, and massive volumes of information that are available (and accessible) have created and connected markets, people, and ideas. This growing network has generated incredible opportunities for people, organizations, and nations to collaborate and extend their influence. But it also has generated all kinds of new vulnerabilities. And only a small minority of our thought leaders and influencers is actively considering how to balance the two.

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Bio-Digital Convergence: The Human as Critical Infrastructure?

Posted by Aaron Schulman

September 21, 2016 at 2:12 PM

Are humans the next critical infrastructure sector?

 

Currently, humanity is being augmented or networked by somewhere around 14 billion connected devices and that number is increasing at an accelerating rate. The rate of growth implies a growing comfort with networked, wearable, and implanted devices – and our connectivity with them.

 

Over the past decade, our work has exposed us to some amazing human-integrated technology advances across a number of industries. We’ve seen need and a desire for longer, healthier lives driving many of the bio-digital developments that evolved quickly from bleeding-edge innovation to ubiquitous use. Implantable Internet of Things (IoT) devices like pacemakers, defibrillators, and insulin pumps are perfect examples – each external, electronic device has the potential to supplement or repair a deficiency that would otherwise shorten or even end someone’s life.

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